Try our corporate solution for free!
(212) 419-8294
vianny.gutierrez-cruz@statista.com

Energy production in the U.S. - Statistics & facts

Energy production can be divided into two categories; primary energy - the extraction of fossil fuels and uranium, as well as harvesting of renewables such as biomass fuels, wind, and solar energy; and secondary energy - electricity generation using primary energy sources. Fossil fuel sources are the main contributor to the United States’ energy production. Petroleum, natural gas, and coal have largely dominated the industry since they were first commercially extracted in the 19th century.

Primary energy – fossil fuels

In the last few decades, U.S. energy production has increased in almost every field, except for coal. Anthracite production in the U.S. has fallen significantly from a mid-20th century high of nearly 45 million short tons. Natural gas has since succeeded coal as the main fuel used for electricity generation. Over the next few decades, energy production is forecast to increase to over 117 quadrillion British thermal units. Greater strides in energy conservation and energy efficiency developments will likely contribute to a fall in fossil fuel dependency in the future.

Primary energy – renewables

Since the world governments have signed the Paris Climate Agreement in 2016, renewable energy production in the U.S. has increased consecutively, reaching 11.6 quadrillion British thermal units in 2019. In a slight deviance from overall renewable energy production, biofuel production decreased in 2019, falling to a daily average of 697,000 barrels of oil equivalent.

Secondary energy – electricity

The U.S. has a total electricity generating capacity of over 1.2 terawatts. Nuclear power plants have the greatest capacity factor of any energy source, meaning the ratio of actual electricity generation to maximum output is close to equal. Due to the dynamic nature of non-dispatchable sources such as solar and wind, their capacity factors are significantly lower.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Energy production in the U.S." and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Fossil fuels

Renewables & electricity

Costs

Interesting statistics

In the following 6 chapters, you will quickly find the 28 most important statistics relating to "Energy production in the U.S.".

Energy production in the U.S.

Dossier on the topic

All important statistics are prepared by our experts – available for direct download as PPT & PDF!
TOP SELLER

Energy production in the U.S. - Statistics & facts

Energy production can be divided into two categories; primary energy - the extraction of fossil fuels and uranium, as well as harvesting of renewables such as biomass fuels, wind, and solar energy; and secondary energy - electricity generation using primary energy sources. Fossil fuel sources are the main contributor to the United States’ energy production. Petroleum, natural gas, and coal have largely dominated the industry since they were first commercially extracted in the 19th century.

Primary energy – fossil fuels

In the last few decades, U.S. energy production has increased in almost every field, except for coal. Anthracite production in the U.S. has fallen significantly from a mid-20th century high of nearly 45 million short tons. Natural gas has since succeeded coal as the main fuel used for electricity generation. Over the next few decades, energy production is forecast to increase to over 117 quadrillion British thermal units. Greater strides in energy conservation and energy efficiency developments will likely contribute to a fall in fossil fuel dependency in the future.

Primary energy – renewables

Since the world governments have signed the Paris Climate Agreement in 2016, renewable energy production in the U.S. has increased consecutively, reaching 11.6 quadrillion British thermal units in 2019. In a slight deviance from overall renewable energy production, biofuel production decreased in 2019, falling to a daily average of 697,000 barrels of oil equivalent.

Secondary energy – electricity

The U.S. has a total electricity generating capacity of over 1.2 terawatts. Nuclear power plants have the greatest capacity factor of any energy source, meaning the ratio of actual electricity generation to maximum output is close to equal. Due to the dynamic nature of non-dispatchable sources such as solar and wind, their capacity factors are significantly lower.

Interesting statistics

In the following 6 chapters, you will quickly find the 28 most important statistics relating to "Energy production in the U.S.".

Contact

Get in touch with us. We are happy to help.
Statista Locations
Contact Vianny Gutierrez-Cruz
Vianny Gutierrez-Cruz
Sales Manager– Contact (United States)

Mon - Fri, 9am - 6pm (EST)

Contact Ziyan Zhang
Ziyan Zhang
Customer Relations– Contact (Asia)

Mon - Fri, 11:30am - 10pm (IST)

Contact Kisara Mizuno
Kisara Mizuno
Customer Success Manager– Contact (Asia)

Mon - Fri, 9:30am - 5:30pm (JST)

Contact Lodovica Biagi
Lodovica Biagi
Director of Operations– Contact (Europe)

Mon - Fri, 9:30am - 5pm (GMT)

Contact Catalina Rodriguez
Catalina Rodriguez
Key Account Manager - LAC– Contact (Latin America)

Mon - Fri, 9am - 6pm (EST)