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Climate change in Russia - statistics & facts

Russia is the fourth largest producer of territorial fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions worldwide, accounting for nearly five percent of global CO2 emissions. The country experienced a heatwave in Siberia in the summer 2020, when the town of Verkhoyansk in Yakutia, which was the coldest place on Earth at 69.8 degrees Celsius below zero in 1892, recorded the highest temperature at 38 degrees Celsius above zero in June 2020. That was one of the factors contributing to the Laptev Sea in the Arctic not freezing in October for the first time on record.

What are the effects of climate change in Russia?

As the mean surface temperature gradually increases, Russia faces a higher risk of wildfires, which burned over eight billion hectares of forest area in the Far Eastern Federal District alone in 2020. Natural disasters and infections could become more common, presenting threats to ecosystems, agriculture, and public health. Furthermore, due to global warming, the sea ice extent in the Arctic significantly receded, while that region accounts for one fifth of Russia's territory and is home to 2.4 million citizens, or two percent of the population. Thaw of permafrost, which is rich in natural resources and is particularly relevant for the mining industry and the extraction of oil and gas, would imply high economic costs.

How could Russia benefit from climate change?

The temperature increase in the Arctic would enable the Northern Sea Route, which was open already by mid-July in 2020 due to the Siberian heatwave. Saving up to 14 days compared to the route over the Suez Canal and the Indian Ocean, the pathway was estimated to transport 80 to 95 million metric tons of cargo by 2024, mostly liquefied natural gas. However, foreign companies like the French shipping and transportation company CMA CGM Group publicly refused to use the route due to concerns over the Arctic's environment. Another potential benefit of the Arctic warming could be new opportunities for agricultural development in the region.

How does Russia tackle climate change?

In September 2019, the country ratified the Paris Agreement of 2015, a document tackling global warming under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. However, Russia set its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target at 25 to 30 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, which was criticized as "critically insufficient" by the non-governmental organization Climate Action Tracker, since that threshold was already met by the country in 2017. In January 2020, the Russian government approved a national action plan for the first stage of adaptation to climate change until 2022. The second stage would run between 2023 and 2025. Furthermore, 400 billion Russian rubles were invested in the construction of renewable power plants between 2025 and 2035.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Climate change in Russia" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Air quality

Forest fires

Public opinion

Interesting statistics

In the following 8 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Climate change in Russia".

Climate change in Russia

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Climate change in Russia - statistics & facts

Russia is the fourth largest producer of territorial fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions worldwide, accounting for nearly five percent of global CO2 emissions. The country experienced a heatwave in Siberia in the summer 2020, when the town of Verkhoyansk in Yakutia, which was the coldest place on Earth at 69.8 degrees Celsius below zero in 1892, recorded the highest temperature at 38 degrees Celsius above zero in June 2020. That was one of the factors contributing to the Laptev Sea in the Arctic not freezing in October for the first time on record.

What are the effects of climate change in Russia?

As the mean surface temperature gradually increases, Russia faces a higher risk of wildfires, which burned over eight billion hectares of forest area in the Far Eastern Federal District alone in 2020. Natural disasters and infections could become more common, presenting threats to ecosystems, agriculture, and public health. Furthermore, due to global warming, the sea ice extent in the Arctic significantly receded, while that region accounts for one fifth of Russia's territory and is home to 2.4 million citizens, or two percent of the population. Thaw of permafrost, which is rich in natural resources and is particularly relevant for the mining industry and the extraction of oil and gas, would imply high economic costs.

How could Russia benefit from climate change?

The temperature increase in the Arctic would enable the Northern Sea Route, which was open already by mid-July in 2020 due to the Siberian heatwave. Saving up to 14 days compared to the route over the Suez Canal and the Indian Ocean, the pathway was estimated to transport 80 to 95 million metric tons of cargo by 2024, mostly liquefied natural gas. However, foreign companies like the French shipping and transportation company CMA CGM Group publicly refused to use the route due to concerns over the Arctic's environment. Another potential benefit of the Arctic warming could be new opportunities for agricultural development in the region.

How does Russia tackle climate change?

In September 2019, the country ratified the Paris Agreement of 2015, a document tackling global warming under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. However, Russia set its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target at 25 to 30 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, which was criticized as "critically insufficient" by the non-governmental organization Climate Action Tracker, since that threshold was already met by the country in 2017. In January 2020, the Russian government approved a national action plan for the first stage of adaptation to climate change until 2022. The second stage would run between 2023 and 2025. Furthermore, 400 billion Russian rubles were invested in the construction of renewable power plants between 2025 and 2035.

Interesting statistics

In the following 8 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Climate change in Russia".

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