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Semiconductor industry in the United States - statistics & facts

The United States is a key market within the global semiconductor industry, leading in research and development (R&D) activities such as electronic design automation (EDA), core intellectual property (IP), chip design, and advanced manufacturing equipment. Semiconductors also form an important part of the U.S. economy: the total impact of the semiconductor industry on the U.S. economy amounted to close to 250 billion U.S. dollars in 2020, supporting 1.85 million jobs in the process. The strength of the U.S. semiconductor industry also plays a significant role in the success of other sectors: a steady supply of chips is good news for industries that depend on semiconductors such as device manufacturers, telecommunications providers, and the automotive sector.

CHIPS for America Act

Investment into chip manufacturing by other countries around the world has helped to erode semiconductor manufacturing capacity in the U.S. To address this, the U.S. government has set out plans for a federal semiconductor incentive program – the CHIPS for America Act. The bill sets out to establish investments and incentives to support the development of the U.S. semiconductor industry, as well as supply chain security. As part of this, the U.S. Senate passed a bill that included 52 billion U.S. dollars in federal investments for domestic semiconductor research, design, and manufacturing. Analysts have suggested that the cumulative impact of a semiconductor industry incentive program on gross domestic product (GDP) would be close to 150 billion U.S. dollars between 2021 and 2026.

U.S. semiconductor companies

Semiconductor companies can be categorized into three distinct types: integrated device manufacturers (IDMs), fabless, and foundry companies. IDMs are responsible for all semiconductor manufacturing processes from design to production. Fabless companies produce their designs for semiconductors but do not own any production facilities. The actual production, or fabrication, of semiconductors, is outsourced to foundry companies. Notable IDMs in the U.S. include Intel, Micron Technology, and Texas Instruments, in addition to an array of fabless companies such as Qualcomm, Nvidia, Broadcom, and AMD. Acquisitions are also a key tactic used by U.S. semiconductor companies to strengthen their place across various markets, with recent examples including AMD’s acquisition of Xilinx and Nvidia’s acquisition of Mellanox Technologies as well as Arm Limited – although the latter is still pending regulatory approval.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Semiconductor industry in the U.S." and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Economic impact

Federal semiconductor incentive program

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the 31 most important statistics relating to "Semiconductor industry in the U.S.".

Semiconductor industry in the U.S.

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Semiconductor industry in the United States - statistics & facts

The United States is a key market within the global semiconductor industry, leading in research and development (R&D) activities such as electronic design automation (EDA), core intellectual property (IP), chip design, and advanced manufacturing equipment. Semiconductors also form an important part of the U.S. economy: the total impact of the semiconductor industry on the U.S. economy amounted to close to 250 billion U.S. dollars in 2020, supporting 1.85 million jobs in the process. The strength of the U.S. semiconductor industry also plays a significant role in the success of other sectors: a steady supply of chips is good news for industries that depend on semiconductors such as device manufacturers, telecommunications providers, and the automotive sector.

CHIPS for America Act

Investment into chip manufacturing by other countries around the world has helped to erode semiconductor manufacturing capacity in the U.S. To address this, the U.S. government has set out plans for a federal semiconductor incentive program – the CHIPS for America Act. The bill sets out to establish investments and incentives to support the development of the U.S. semiconductor industry, as well as supply chain security. As part of this, the U.S. Senate passed a bill that included 52 billion U.S. dollars in federal investments for domestic semiconductor research, design, and manufacturing. Analysts have suggested that the cumulative impact of a semiconductor industry incentive program on gross domestic product (GDP) would be close to 150 billion U.S. dollars between 2021 and 2026.

U.S. semiconductor companies

Semiconductor companies can be categorized into three distinct types: integrated device manufacturers (IDMs), fabless, and foundry companies. IDMs are responsible for all semiconductor manufacturing processes from design to production. Fabless companies produce their designs for semiconductors but do not own any production facilities. The actual production, or fabrication, of semiconductors, is outsourced to foundry companies. Notable IDMs in the U.S. include Intel, Micron Technology, and Texas Instruments, in addition to an array of fabless companies such as Qualcomm, Nvidia, Broadcom, and AMD. Acquisitions are also a key tactic used by U.S. semiconductor companies to strengthen their place across various markets, with recent examples including AMD’s acquisition of Xilinx and Nvidia’s acquisition of Mellanox Technologies as well as Arm Limited – although the latter is still pending regulatory approval.

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the 31 most important statistics relating to "Semiconductor industry in the U.S.".

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