Remote work in Poland - statistics & facts

Remote work, also known as telecommuting or teleworking, is a type of flexible working arrangement that allows the employee to work outside of a central place of their work. As a result, the employee does not need to commute or travel to their work location. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic played an essential role in the introduction of home-office in Poland during the first months of 2020. In fact, the share of people working from home reached a record high of nearly nine percent that year.

How has the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic affected the Polish labor market?

As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, companies were forced to transition to virtual office in order to ensure employee safety. Education and public administration were the two industries most likely to provide remote work, whereas fewer retail employees had the chance to work from home. The new working model resulted in Poles acquiring new IT skills. A survey conducted in 2021 revealed that almost 55 percent of employees got better at using communication platforms, e.g. Teams or Skype, and approximately four in ten respondents improved their cloud computing skills.
Nonetheless, home-office also brought in a number of challenges. 27 percent of Poles found it difficult to maintain an adequate work-life balance when working remotely. In terms of external challenges, making new contacts and technical issues figured among the most-quoted difficulties. Additional costs wise, 48 percent of remote workers stated that they saw an increase in their electricity bills and nearly every fifth respondent faced additional expenses for office equipment.

Remote work after the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Poland

A survey carried out in November 2020 showed that approximately one in two companies were unsure about what kind of remote work hours would be applied after the pandemic. At the same time, 15 percent of employers planned to continue with home office for two days a week. Regarding employees' opinions on a hybrid work model, one third would prefer to work on a rotation system - two to three days working from home and two to three days in the office. Upon return to the office, seven percent of companies decided that their leased office space would increase compared to the time before the pandemic.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Remote work in Poland" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Freelancing and self-employment

Software and tools

Remote work during COVID-19

Interesting statistics

In the following 7 chapters, you will quickly find the 41 most important statistics relating to "Remote work in Poland".

Remote work in Poland

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Remote work in Poland - statistics & facts

Remote work, also known as telecommuting or teleworking, is a type of flexible working arrangement that allows the employee to work outside of a central place of their work. As a result, the employee does not need to commute or travel to their work location. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic played an essential role in the introduction of home-office in Poland during the first months of 2020. In fact, the share of people working from home reached a record high of nearly nine percent that year.

How has the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic affected the Polish labor market?

As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, companies were forced to transition to virtual office in order to ensure employee safety. Education and public administration were the two industries most likely to provide remote work, whereas fewer retail employees had the chance to work from home. The new working model resulted in Poles acquiring new IT skills. A survey conducted in 2021 revealed that almost 55 percent of employees got better at using communication platforms, e.g. Teams or Skype, and approximately four in ten respondents improved their cloud computing skills.
Nonetheless, home-office also brought in a number of challenges. 27 percent of Poles found it difficult to maintain an adequate work-life balance when working remotely. In terms of external challenges, making new contacts and technical issues figured among the most-quoted difficulties. Additional costs wise, 48 percent of remote workers stated that they saw an increase in their electricity bills and nearly every fifth respondent faced additional expenses for office equipment.

Remote work after the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Poland

A survey carried out in November 2020 showed that approximately one in two companies were unsure about what kind of remote work hours would be applied after the pandemic. At the same time, 15 percent of employers planned to continue with home office for two days a week. Regarding employees' opinions on a hybrid work model, one third would prefer to work on a rotation system - two to three days working from home and two to three days in the office. Upon return to the office, seven percent of companies decided that their leased office space would increase compared to the time before the pandemic.

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