Premium
Cement prices in the United States from 2007 to 2016 (in U.S. dollars per metric ton)*

Exclusive Premium statistic

Get a Premium Account for unrestrained access.
Benefits of our Premium membership:

  • Access to all Premium statistics
  • Download as XLS, PNG and PDF
  • Detailed source and background information
Premium Account
$49 per month*
(billed annually)
*Single license
Loading statistic...
Price in U.S. dollars per metric ton
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
© Statista 2017

Show further information

Complete Source Details

AdvertisementTableau Software
 
About This Statistic

This statistic represents the price of Portland and masonry cement in the United States between 2007 and 2016. In 2016, the cost of this construction material came to around 111 U.S. dollars per metric ton.


Cement prices – additional information

The discovery of cement can be credited to ancient Roman times, where a mixture of volcanic ash and lime were used to form mortar. In construction today, cement can be characterized as hydraulic or nonhydraulic, based on its ability or inability, respectively, to set under wet conditions or underwater. Through a chemical reaction between the dry cement ingredients and water, hydraulic cements become adhesive and thus also protect the hardened material from chemical attack. In 2016, the United States imported 12 million metric tons of hydraulic cement for consumption. One of the most common types of hydraulic cement is known as Portland cement. It is used in concrete, mortar, stucco, as well as grout. However, this type of cement can cause chemical burns, while the powder can cause irritation and even lung cancer. The United States produced 85.4 million metric tons of Portland cement and masonry cement in 2016.

In 2016, cement prices finally surpassed pre-recession prices, which was about 104 U.S. dollars per metric ton the year prior to the global recession. The cement price per ton relies heavily on demands from the construction industry. Global production is expected to reach 4.83 billion metric tons by 2030. As of January 2016, France’s Cie de Saint-Gobain, one of the leading manufacturers of construction materials worldwide, enjoyed sales totaling 54.54 billion U.S. dollars.

Show more…
Special Functions
Download as ...
Graphic (PNG)
Excel (XLS)
PowerPoint (PPT)
PDF
Options
Settings
Print
Research Alerts
Download started
Please be patient - this may take a moment

Statista Accounts: Access All Statistics. Starting from $588 / Year

Statistics on "Cement industry in the U.S."

The most important statistics

Related Studies: Available to Download in PDF or PPTX Format

Cement industry in the U.S.

All Information
in one Presentation

Cement industry in the U.S.

Everything On "Cement industry in the U.S." in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References.

Statista for Your Company: The Research and Analysis Tool

  • Product Film
  • Statistics
  • Downloads

Our Premium Statistics - facts for your business

Currently, Statista provides more than 1 million statistics. 93 percent (all Premium content) are exclusively accessible via our professional accounts.

Unlimited access

As a Statista Premium customer, you receive unlimited access to all statistics at all times. Including downloads of data in the most common formats (XLS, PDF & PNG). Create relevant and significant statistics in no time.

You are in good company

Further Content: Statistics, Studies, and Topic Pages

Our Business Solutions: Save Time and Money

only

$588*

per year
Your advantages
  • Full access to all our statistics
  • Download as XLS, PDF & PNG
  • Relevant data: complete source information
All functions of our platform illustrated face-to-face
  • Learn how Statista supports your company
  • Extensive tour across the whole portal
  • Personal guidance by our support team
The knowledge database for your company
  • All functions of the Premium Account
  • Access to dossiers, forecasts and studies
  • Access to our international database
  • Publishing rights and other exclusive functions