Admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada 2006-2015

Number of admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada in fiscal years 2006 to 2015

by Statista Research Department, last edited May 28, 2015
Admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada 2006-2015 This statistic shows the number of admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada in the fiscal years 2006 to 2015. In fiscal year 2006, there were 4,578 inmates admitted to administrative segregation in Canadian federal prisons.
Administrative Segregation

Administrative segregation is the separation of an inmate from the general population either voluntarily or involuntarily. The inmate is kept locked alone in a cell for up to 23 hours a day. Inmates may only be placed into administrative segregation if they meet certain criteria. They must either be a danger to staff or other inmates, have the potential to hinder an ongoing investigation, or be in danger. Because administrative segregation is not meant as a punitive measure, inmates should be afforded the same rights as those in general population. Although there is no maximum mandated length of time for administrative segregation, the guideline is to return the offender to the general population at the soonest opportunity. Critics say that despite its good intentions, in reality, administrative segregation is often a dumping ground for inmates with mental health issues.

At least partly in response to criticism, the length of time inmates spend in administrative segregation has been declining over the past decade. On the other hand, admission rates to administrative segregation have been mixed over that time period. While the rate of Caucasian admissions has declined, both Black and Aboriginal admissions have been increasing. Not all admissions to segregation are forced. Nearly a quarter of admissions in fiscal year 2015 were voluntary. Inmates may request being placed in administrative segregation if they feel their safety is under threat.
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Number of admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada in fiscal years 2006 to 2015

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InmatesTotal admissions
2014-20154,9998,309
2013-20145,0738,124
2012-20135,0488,208
2011-20125,0648,316
2010-20114,9728,089
2009-20104,6787,504
2008-20094,7977,615
2007-20084,6267,236
2006-20074,7117,475
2005-20064,5787,572
InmatesTotal admissions
2014-20154,9998,309
2013-20145,0738,124
2012-20135,0488,208
2011-20125,0648,316
2010-20114,9728,089
2009-20104,6787,504
2008-20094,7977,615
2007-20084,6267,236
2006-20074,7117,475
2005-20064,5787,572
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by Statista Research Department, last edited May 28, 2015
This statistic shows the number of admissions to administrative segregation in federal prisons in Canada in the fiscal years 2006 to 2015. In fiscal year 2006, there were 4,578 inmates admitted to administrative segregation in Canadian federal prisons.
Administrative Segregation

Administrative segregation is the separation of an inmate from the general population either voluntarily or involuntarily. The inmate is kept locked alone in a cell for up to 23 hours a day. Inmates may only be placed into administrative segregation if they meet certain criteria. They must either be a danger to staff or other inmates, have the potential to hinder an ongoing investigation, or be in danger. Because administrative segregation is not meant as a punitive measure, inmates should be afforded the same rights as those in general population. Although there is no maximum mandated length of time for administrative segregation, the guideline is to return the offender to the general population at the soonest opportunity. Critics say that despite its good intentions, in reality, administrative segregation is often a dumping ground for inmates with mental health issues.

At least partly in response to criticism, the length of time inmates spend in administrative segregation has been declining over the past decade. On the other hand, admission rates to administrative segregation have been mixed over that time period. While the rate of Caucasian admissions has declined, both Black and Aboriginal admissions have been increasing. Not all admissions to segregation are forced. Nearly a quarter of admissions in fiscal year 2015 were voluntary. Inmates may request being placed in administrative segregation if they feel their safety is under threat.
Show more
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