Occupations in the U.S. by divorce rate

Top 15 Jobs in the U.S. with the highest divorce rate based on 2000 U.S. Census data

Occupations in the U.S. by divorce rate This survey shows the top 15 Jobs in the U.S. with the highest divorce rate, based on an analysis of the 2000 U.S. Census data. The divorce rate of maids and housekeeping cleaners amounts to about 26 percent.
Jobs in the United States

The employment rate in the United States changed constantly over the last few years. It has shifted from 61.7 percent in 1991 to 64.4 percent in 2000 and stood at 58.6 percent in 2013. An employed person is someone who did any work for pay or profit, persons who did at least 15 hours of unpaid work in a family-operated enterprise; and persons who were temporarily absent from their regular jobs because of illness, vacation, bad weather, industrial dispute, or various personal reasons.
The development in the employment rate can be seen as a reflection of the economic downfall resulting from the economic crisis. Although the U.S. economy has been getting back on its feet in the last few years, the employment situation is still far from the 2009 level.
This is also showing in the assessment of the American people of the economic situation. In March 2014, about 66 percent of U.S. Americans felt that it was a bad time to find quality job in the United States, whereas 30 percent felt optimistic to find a quality job in the United States at that time.
The employment situation in a country obviously has a strong influence on peoples' lives. A possible negative effect that a low employment rate could have on the U.S. child birth rate is illustrated here: about 65 percent of U.S. American adults said that a reason for not having more children could be the cost of raising a children and not having enough money to afford a child.
The average cost of raising a child from birth to age 18 in the United States totaled to nearly 226,920 U.S. dollars per child.
This can often hardly be covered with low wage jobs. For example, fast food workers were among the lowest paid jobs in the United States with an average hourly wage of about 9.09 U.S. dollars.
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Top 15 Jobs in the U.S. with the highest divorce rate based on 2000 U.S. Census data

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Divorce rate
Maids and housekeeping cleaners26.38%
Roofers26.85%
Waiters/Waitresses27.12%
Telemarketers28.1%
Baggage porters and concierges28.49%
Entertainers and performers, sports and related workers28.49%
Nursing, psychiatric and home health aides28.95%
Telephone operators29.3%
Factory workers: Food & Tobacco29.78%
Gaming service worker31.35%
Extruding machine operator32.74%
Gaming cage worker34.66%
Massage therapists38.22%
Bartenders38.43%
Dancers & Choreographers43.05%
Divorce rate
Maids and housekeeping cleaners26.38%
Roofers26.85%
Waiters/Waitresses27.12%
Telemarketers28.1%
Baggage porters and concierges28.49%
Entertainers and performers, sports and related workers28.49%
Nursing, psychiatric and home health aides28.95%
Telephone operators29.3%
Factory workers: Food & Tobacco29.78%
Gaming service worker31.35%
Extruding machine operator32.74%
Gaming cage worker34.66%
Massage therapists38.22%
Bartenders38.43%
Dancers & Choreographers43.05%
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This survey shows the top 15 Jobs in the U.S. with the highest divorce rate, based on an analysis of the 2000 U.S. Census data. The divorce rate of maids and housekeeping cleaners amounts to about 26 percent.
Jobs in the United States

The employment rate in the United States changed constantly over the last few years. It has shifted from 61.7 percent in 1991 to 64.4 percent in 2000 and stood at 58.6 percent in 2013. An employed person is someone who did any work for pay or profit, persons who did at least 15 hours of unpaid work in a family-operated enterprise; and persons who were temporarily absent from their regular jobs because of illness, vacation, bad weather, industrial dispute, or various personal reasons.
The development in the employment rate can be seen as a reflection of the economic downfall resulting from the economic crisis. Although the U.S. economy has been getting back on its feet in the last few years, the employment situation is still far from the 2009 level.
This is also showing in the assessment of the American people of the economic situation. In March 2014, about 66 percent of U.S. Americans felt that it was a bad time to find quality job in the United States, whereas 30 percent felt optimistic to find a quality job in the United States at that time.
The employment situation in a country obviously has a strong influence on peoples' lives. A possible negative effect that a low employment rate could have on the U.S. child birth rate is illustrated here: about 65 percent of U.S. American adults said that a reason for not having more children could be the cost of raising a children and not having enough money to afford a child.
The average cost of raising a child from birth to age 18 in the United States totaled to nearly 226,920 U.S. dollars per child.
This can often hardly be covered with low wage jobs. For example, fast food workers were among the lowest paid jobs in the United States with an average hourly wage of about 9.09 U.S. dollars.
Show more
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