Try our corporate solution for free!
(212) 419-8286
hadley.ward@statista.com

Share of UK household spend going on sports leisure, by disposable income group 2018

This statistic shows the percentage share of total weekly household expenditure going towards sports admissions, subscriptions, leisure class fees and equipment hire in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2018, by disposable equivalised income decile group.

Disposable equivalent income

Within this statistic household incomes have been ranked in ascending order and divided into decile groups in order to examine expenditure patterns between different income groups. Income deciles divide the household income distribution into 10 equal parts. Households with the smallest income lie in the first decile and those with the largest income lie in the top decile. Disposable income is defined as the remaining income, after the removal of statutory deductions, income tax and national insurance contributions. The disposable equivalent income deciles used in this statistic were formed by dividing the household's income by the household's consumption units. This income concept assumes that income is evenly distributed between all members within the household, in relation to the aforementioned consumption needs. Equivalisation therefore takes into account that larger households are likely to need a higher income to achieve the same standard of living as households with fewer members.

Trend

This statistic presents a clear relationship between the percentage of weekly household expenditure spent on sports admissions; subscriptions; leisure class fees; and equipment hire, and the disposable equivalised income decile group within which a given household is contained. It can be inferred from this statistic that households with greater disposable equivalised income allocate a greater share of their weekly expenditure to the sports admissions, subscriptions, leisure class fees, and equipment hire, with the 10th decile group in this study allocating over 1.6 percent of their weekly household expenditures to these goods and services.

Interpretations

Although this relationship could be used to suggest that households with a greater the disposable equivalised income attribute a higher value to these goods and services than those within lower the disposable equivalised income decile groups, this relationship could also be interpreted as a function of the diminishing marginal utility of disposable income itself. It could be argued that there exists goods and services that are considered much more essential than sports admissions, subscriptions, leisure class fees and equipment hire, an example of one such essential good is sufficient fresh water provisions. As the expenditures associated with these essential goods and services will remain stable irrespective of the consumer’s total disposable equivalent income. These goods will necessarily demand a greater proportion of the total expenditures of households within the lower decile groups than those within the higher decile groups. The remaining disposable income of each respective household will therefore represent a greater share of the total disposable equivalised income of households within higher decile groups. If it were the case that households allocate an identical share of this remaining disposable income towards sports admissions; subscriptions; leisure class fees; and equipment hire, the share of the total disposable income allocated to these goods would be higher for households within higher decile groups.

Percentage of weekly household expenditure going on sports admissions and subscriptions in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2018*, by disposable income decile group

Loading statistic...
You need to log in to download this statistic
Register for free
Already a member?
Log in
Show detailed source information?
Register for free
Already a member?
Log in
Source

Release date

March 2020

Region

United Kingdom

Survey time period

2019

Number of respondents

5,480 respondents

Special properties

households.

Method of interview

Panel survey

Supplementary notes

* The figures show weekly expenditure of households divided into decile groups, ranging from households with the lowest ten percent disposable income up to those with the highest disposable income.

Statista Accounts: Access All Statistics. Starting from $468 / Year
Basic Account
Get to know the platform

You only have access to basic statistics.

Single Account
The ideal entry-level account for individual users
  • Instant access to 1m statistics
  • Download in XLS, PDF & PNG format
  • Detailed references
$59 $39 / Month *
in the first 12 months
Corporate Account
Full access

Corporate solution including all features.

* Prices do not include sales tax.

Statistics on "Sports in the Netherlands"

Statista Accounts: Access All Statistics. Starting from $468 / Year
Learn more about how Statista can support your business.