Emissions in the U.S. - Statistics & Facts

Over the course of two centuries, the United States has cemented itself as the biggest economy in the world. In doing so, it has emitted roughly 400 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This makes the U.S. the largest overall emitter of CO2 worldwide. Much like other western nations, emissions began to ramp up in the U.S. during the industrial revolution, and have increased massively since.

U.S. emissions are declining

Despite the U.S. releasing the most cumulative emissions worldwide, its annual emissions are now less than China. During 2018, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions totaled 6.67 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The main source of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. is the energy sector, with carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption amounting to 5.1 billion metric tons in 2019. However, this was a reduction of roughly one billion metric tons when compared to the peak emissions released in 2007. These reductions in energy related CO2 emissions coincide with the country’s move away from coal combustion, and its transition to natural gas and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

As greenhouse gas emissions have fallen in the U.S., so to have air pollutant emissions. For example, PM2.5 particulate matter concentrations have halved in the past three decades. This in turn has led to a reduction in the number of deaths attributable to air pollution.

A carbon neutral future in the U.S.?

In 2016, the Obama administration signed up to the Paris Agreement, which has the aim of limiting global warming to below two degrees Celsius. However, during President Trumps term in office the United States pulled out of the deal, in addition to a number of other climate policy rollbacks. During his campaign trail, president elect Joe Biden vowed to rejoin the Paris Agreement should he become president, and also proposed making U.S. power production carbon neutral by 2035. This plan would involve trillions of dollars being invested in energy efficient buildings, electric vehicles, and clean energy innovation. A number of the leading electric power producers in the U.S. have also announced they are now looking to new technologies to reduce their carbon footprint, such as carbon capture solutions.

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Greenhouse gas emissions

Air pollutants

Segments

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Emissions in the United States

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Emissions in the U.S. - Statistics & Facts

Over the course of two centuries, the United States has cemented itself as the biggest economy in the world. In doing so, it has emitted roughly 400 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This makes the U.S. the largest overall emitter of CO2 worldwide. Much like other western nations, emissions began to ramp up in the U.S. during the industrial revolution, and have increased massively since.

U.S. emissions are declining

Despite the U.S. releasing the most cumulative emissions worldwide, its annual emissions are now less than China. During 2018, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions totaled 6.67 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The main source of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. is the energy sector, with carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption amounting to 5.1 billion metric tons in 2019. However, this was a reduction of roughly one billion metric tons when compared to the peak emissions released in 2007. These reductions in energy related CO2 emissions coincide with the country’s move away from coal combustion, and its transition to natural gas and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

As greenhouse gas emissions have fallen in the U.S., so to have air pollutant emissions. For example, PM2.5 particulate matter concentrations have halved in the past three decades. This in turn has led to a reduction in the number of deaths attributable to air pollution.

A carbon neutral future in the U.S.?

In 2016, the Obama administration signed up to the Paris Agreement, which has the aim of limiting global warming to below two degrees Celsius. However, during President Trumps term in office the United States pulled out of the deal, in addition to a number of other climate policy rollbacks. During his campaign trail, president elect Joe Biden vowed to rejoin the Paris Agreement should he become president, and also proposed making U.S. power production carbon neutral by 2035. This plan would involve trillions of dollars being invested in energy efficient buildings, electric vehicles, and clean energy innovation. A number of the leading electric power producers in the U.S. have also announced they are now looking to new technologies to reduce their carbon footprint, such as carbon capture solutions.

Interesting statistics

In the following 6 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Emissions in the U.S.".

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