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News in Latin America - statistics & facts

News consumers around the world are increasingly turning to online publications and outlets to keep up to date, and Latin American audiences are no exception. Social media is a popular option for news access despite concerns about reliability, and the way many Latin American consumers find their news is problematic in this regard. Between 50 and 60 percent of people surveyed living in Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico said that they find their news on social networks via links posted by people they know, thereby exposing themselves to illegitimate or unreputable sources. Paid news access is also considered less favorable than free content, a tendency which can be seen in audiences worldwide.

Paying for news

In line with global trends, most Latin American consumers do not pay to access news. Over 80 percent of consumers in Colombia and Argentina admitted that they do not pay for digital news, and the share of digital news subscribers in Mexico was reportedly just eight percent, with more than 90 percent only reading online news which is provided for free. The reluctance to purchase printed newspapers providing daily or weekly snapshots is only natural now that many online news outlets offer updates in a live feed format at no cost to the reader. Indeed, newspaper reach in Latin America is generally low and most consumers in the region and other countries around the world exclusively read news which can be accessed for free.
There are however some exceptions to this trend. A study looking at the frequency of news consumption via print and digital news subscriptions worldwide revealed that Brazilian consumers were significantly more likely to pay for news every day than those in North America, Australia, and other Latin American countries. The appeal of both print and digital subscriptions to Brazilian news audiences is unsurprising in the current climate. Free content not published by reputable sources or circulating on social media is often hard to verify, and fake news is a serious problem. Printed newspapers remain one of the most trusted news sources in Brazil, and trust is important to Brazilian news readers. Data gathered on the reasons for having news subscriptions in Brazil supports this, with quality and credibility cited as the main rationale behind subscribing to an online news source.

Spotlight on fake news in Brazil

The news landscape in Brazil can be difficult for consumers to navigate. This is not only due to the general spread of fake news, an issue affecting countries worldwide, but also as a result of the government’s deliberate efforts to disseminate inaccurate information.
Studies into this found that President Bolsonaro himself makes hundreds of statements each month which are believed to be false or distorted, a problem which also detrimentally affected the country’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Concern about fake news online is predictably high, and the public do not feel that the government is doing enough to combat fake news on the internet and social media. In fact, most Brazilians responding to a survey on fake news supported a law requiring social media companies to protect users from false information.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "News in Latin America" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Trust

President Bolsonaro and the news

Paying for news in Brazil

Interesting statistics

In the following 8 chapters, you will quickly find the 57 most important statistics relating to "News in Latin America".

News in Latin America

Dossier on the topic

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News in Latin America - statistics & facts

News consumers around the world are increasingly turning to online publications and outlets to keep up to date, and Latin American audiences are no exception. Social media is a popular option for news access despite concerns about reliability, and the way many Latin American consumers find their news is problematic in this regard. Between 50 and 60 percent of people surveyed living in Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico said that they find their news on social networks via links posted by people they know, thereby exposing themselves to illegitimate or unreputable sources. Paid news access is also considered less favorable than free content, a tendency which can be seen in audiences worldwide.

Paying for news

In line with global trends, most Latin American consumers do not pay to access news. Over 80 percent of consumers in Colombia and Argentina admitted that they do not pay for digital news, and the share of digital news subscribers in Mexico was reportedly just eight percent, with more than 90 percent only reading online news which is provided for free. The reluctance to purchase printed newspapers providing daily or weekly snapshots is only natural now that many online news outlets offer updates in a live feed format at no cost to the reader. Indeed, newspaper reach in Latin America is generally low and most consumers in the region and other countries around the world exclusively read news which can be accessed for free.
There are however some exceptions to this trend. A study looking at the frequency of news consumption via print and digital news subscriptions worldwide revealed that Brazilian consumers were significantly more likely to pay for news every day than those in North America, Australia, and other Latin American countries. The appeal of both print and digital subscriptions to Brazilian news audiences is unsurprising in the current climate. Free content not published by reputable sources or circulating on social media is often hard to verify, and fake news is a serious problem. Printed newspapers remain one of the most trusted news sources in Brazil, and trust is important to Brazilian news readers. Data gathered on the reasons for having news subscriptions in Brazil supports this, with quality and credibility cited as the main rationale behind subscribing to an online news source.

Spotlight on fake news in Brazil

The news landscape in Brazil can be difficult for consumers to navigate. This is not only due to the general spread of fake news, an issue affecting countries worldwide, but also as a result of the government’s deliberate efforts to disseminate inaccurate information.
Studies into this found that President Bolsonaro himself makes hundreds of statements each month which are believed to be false or distorted, a problem which also detrimentally affected the country’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Concern about fake news online is predictably high, and the public do not feel that the government is doing enough to combat fake news on the internet and social media. In fact, most Brazilians responding to a survey on fake news supported a law requiring social media companies to protect users from false information.

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