Nuclear power in Europe - statistics & facts

In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in March 2011, the prominent role of nuclear energy in Europe was questioned by many governments. As one of the most radical governments to abandon its nuclear energy program, Germany has the greatest number of permanently closed nuclear plants next to the United Kingdom. The German government plans to have shut down all remaining nuclear reactors by 2022. In contrast, France still relies heavily on nuclear power generation. It has the second highest number of operable nuclear reactors worldwide and an additional reactor under construction. Apart from France, the nuclear share is also quite high in a few other European countries such as Slovakia, Ukraine, Hungary and Belgium, with nuclear share amounting to approximately half of the total electricity generation. The largest nuclear power reactor under construction in the world as of 2021 was located in Finland, the Olkiluoto 3 with an expected gross electricity generation of 1.72 gigawatt electrical.

Across the globe, Asia is building nuclear reactors with the capacity of 38 gigawatt electrical, the highest among all regions in the world, and majority of those were being built in China. In the European Union, the generation of nuclear energy has been dropping since 2005, amounting to 822 terawatt-hours in 2018. This made up roughly a third of global nuclear power generation. The amount of nuclear energy produced in the European Union was equivalent to 209 million tonnes of oil equivalent, all of which was consumed inland. Nuclear energy once surpassed 32 percent of the Union's fuel mix in 1995, which has been on the decline ever since. Today, it still accounts for more than a quarter, with the only source generating more energy than nuclear being renewables and biofuels.

According to a 2019 survey among residents in France, the country’s energy independence was the most convincing argument for supporting nuclear power generation. Additionally, 39 percent of respondents supported the use of nuclear energy as the sector created many jobs. By comparison, Italy is the only European country next to Lithuania to have completely phased-out nuclear energy use and support for the generation type was notably low. Looking into the future, despite the European Green Deal aiming for the region to become climate neutral by 2050, some has forecasted a gradual reduction of nuclear power consumption in the European Union in the next decades to come, under a business-as-usual scenario.

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Nuclear power in Europe

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Nuclear power in Europe - statistics & facts

In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in March 2011, the prominent role of nuclear energy in Europe was questioned by many governments. As one of the most radical governments to abandon its nuclear energy program, Germany has the greatest number of permanently closed nuclear plants next to the United Kingdom. The German government plans to have shut down all remaining nuclear reactors by 2022. In contrast, France still relies heavily on nuclear power generation. It has the second highest number of operable nuclear reactors worldwide and an additional reactor under construction. Apart from France, the nuclear share is also quite high in a few other European countries such as Slovakia, Ukraine, Hungary and Belgium, with nuclear share amounting to approximately half of the total electricity generation. The largest nuclear power reactor under construction in the world as of 2021 was located in Finland, the Olkiluoto 3 with an expected gross electricity generation of 1.72 gigawatt electrical.

Across the globe, Asia is building nuclear reactors with the capacity of 38 gigawatt electrical, the highest among all regions in the world, and majority of those were being built in China. In the European Union, the generation of nuclear energy has been dropping since 2005, amounting to 822 terawatt-hours in 2018. This made up roughly a third of global nuclear power generation. The amount of nuclear energy produced in the European Union was equivalent to 209 million tonnes of oil equivalent, all of which was consumed inland. Nuclear energy once surpassed 32 percent of the Union's fuel mix in 1995, which has been on the decline ever since. Today, it still accounts for more than a quarter, with the only source generating more energy than nuclear being renewables and biofuels.

According to a 2019 survey among residents in France, the country’s energy independence was the most convincing argument for supporting nuclear power generation. Additionally, 39 percent of respondents supported the use of nuclear energy as the sector created many jobs. By comparison, Italy is the only European country next to Lithuania to have completely phased-out nuclear energy use and support for the generation type was notably low. Looking into the future, despite the European Green Deal aiming for the region to become climate neutral by 2050, some has forecasted a gradual reduction of nuclear power consumption in the European Union in the next decades to come, under a business-as-usual scenario.

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