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Electricity in Brazil - Statistics & Facts

In 1879, the first commercial light bulbs developed by Thomas Edison were sold in the United States. Ten years later, Brazil's first hydropower plant was inaugurated, in the state of Minas Gerais. Since then, the South American country went on to become one of the leading hydropower producers worldwide. Nevertheless, in line with global trends, solar and wind power have been gaining traction in Brazil’s electricity sector.

A historical dependence on hydropower

Brazil is the largest electricity producer in Latin America, with more than 625 terawatt-hours generated in 2019 – almost double that of runner-up Mexico. For several years now, more than 80 percent of the electricity generation in the country originated from renewable sources, making the Brazilian electricity industry one of the cleanest in the world.

The sector’s relative independence from fossil fuels stems from the resourceful use of Brazil’s abundant water resources. In fact, hydropower accounted for roughly two thirds of the national electricity generation in 2019. The Itaipu Dam, a binational investment located on the border between Brazil and Paraguay, is the second largest hydroelectric dam in the world based on generation capacity, only behind the Three Gorges Dam in China.

Diversification of the electricity matrix

Despite historically relying on hydropower plants to supply its energy demand, Brazil’s electricity matrix has been shifting in recent years. With its large hydropower potential already mostly exploited, in combination with growing concerns about the social and environmental impacts of dam construction, the country has started to focus investments in solar and wind power. Out of the more than 38 gigawatts of additions to the generation capacity already approved as of January 2021, one percent referred to large hydropower. Meanwhile, solar and wind plants accounted for 70 percent of additions. By 2025, these two sources are expected to make up more than 15 percent of Brazil’s electricity capacity.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Electricity in Brazil" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Consumption

Utility companies

Power outages

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Electricity in Brazil".

Electricity in Brazil

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Electricity in Brazil - Statistics & Facts

In 1879, the first commercial light bulbs developed by Thomas Edison were sold in the United States. Ten years later, Brazil's first hydropower plant was inaugurated, in the state of Minas Gerais. Since then, the South American country went on to become one of the leading hydropower producers worldwide. Nevertheless, in line with global trends, solar and wind power have been gaining traction in Brazil’s electricity sector.

A historical dependence on hydropower

Brazil is the largest electricity producer in Latin America, with more than 625 terawatt-hours generated in 2019 – almost double that of runner-up Mexico. For several years now, more than 80 percent of the electricity generation in the country originated from renewable sources, making the Brazilian electricity industry one of the cleanest in the world.

The sector’s relative independence from fossil fuels stems from the resourceful use of Brazil’s abundant water resources. In fact, hydropower accounted for roughly two thirds of the national electricity generation in 2019. The Itaipu Dam, a binational investment located on the border between Brazil and Paraguay, is the second largest hydroelectric dam in the world based on generation capacity, only behind the Three Gorges Dam in China.

Diversification of the electricity matrix

Despite historically relying on hydropower plants to supply its energy demand, Brazil’s electricity matrix has been shifting in recent years. With its large hydropower potential already mostly exploited, in combination with growing concerns about the social and environmental impacts of dam construction, the country has started to focus investments in solar and wind power. Out of the more than 38 gigawatts of additions to the generation capacity already approved as of January 2021, one percent referred to large hydropower. Meanwhile, solar and wind plants accounted for 70 percent of additions. By 2025, these two sources are expected to make up more than 15 percent of Brazil’s electricity capacity.

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Electricity in Brazil".

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