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Electricity market in Japan - statistics & facts

As one of the global leaders in the manufacturing industry, with major exports including automobiles, consumer electronics, and computers, Japan's manufacturing industry naturally has a high electricity demand. The country's industrial sector had the largest electricity demand, and manufacturing was the leading industry to consume energy.

 Electricity market in Japan 

In 1938, the Japanese government nationalized all power companies to secure the electricity supply during the Second World War. After the war, the Allied Powers restructured the Japanese system, including the electricity market, and the main ten regional electric utilities were privatized. The electricity market was further liberalized, but competition remained limited since retailers of low voltage electricity mainly sell their electricity locally to homes or small shops.
The market continued to be dominated by ten regional electric utilities, with Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., also known as TEPCO, representing the largest electric power company. The company came under international criticism after the nuclear accident at its Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011.

 Sources for electricity generation in Japan

   The nuclear disaster in 2011 affected the electricity market insofar as nuclear energy was replaced with fossil fuels as sources with the largest share of electricity production. In recent years, natural gas and coal remained the largest energy sources. Since Japan lacks domestic reserves of fossil fuels, it is heavily dependent on imports. This caused a decline in the self-sufficiency rate of primary energy, as well as an increase in electricity rates for homes shortly after the disaster. Recently a short supply of LNG resulted in Japanese power prices hitting a record high, making Japan one of the countries with the highest global electricity prices.
To ensure a stable energy supply, reduce electric power costs, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, Japan's current energy policy aims to replace fossil fuels with renewable and nuclear energy. The Japanese government intends to reach a renewable energy share of around 24 percent, and a nuclear energy share of around 22 percent by 2030. While the nuclear share of electricity generation increased up to over seven percent in recent years, the share of renewable energy in electricity production increased up to 18 percent, with hydropower representing the largest renewable energy source.

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Renewable energy

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Electricity market in Japan

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Electricity market in Japan - statistics & facts

As one of the global leaders in the manufacturing industry, with major exports including automobiles, consumer electronics, and computers, Japan's manufacturing industry naturally has a high electricity demand. The country's industrial sector had the largest electricity demand, and manufacturing was the leading industry to consume energy.

 Electricity market in Japan 

In 1938, the Japanese government nationalized all power companies to secure the electricity supply during the Second World War. After the war, the Allied Powers restructured the Japanese system, including the electricity market, and the main ten regional electric utilities were privatized. The electricity market was further liberalized, but competition remained limited since retailers of low voltage electricity mainly sell their electricity locally to homes or small shops.
The market continued to be dominated by ten regional electric utilities, with Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., also known as TEPCO, representing the largest electric power company. The company came under international criticism after the nuclear accident at its Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011.

 Sources for electricity generation in Japan

   The nuclear disaster in 2011 affected the electricity market insofar as nuclear energy was replaced with fossil fuels as sources with the largest share of electricity production. In recent years, natural gas and coal remained the largest energy sources. Since Japan lacks domestic reserves of fossil fuels, it is heavily dependent on imports. This caused a decline in the self-sufficiency rate of primary energy, as well as an increase in electricity rates for homes shortly after the disaster. Recently a short supply of LNG resulted in Japanese power prices hitting a record high, making Japan one of the countries with the highest global electricity prices.
To ensure a stable energy supply, reduce electric power costs, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, Japan's current energy policy aims to replace fossil fuels with renewable and nuclear energy. The Japanese government intends to reach a renewable energy share of around 24 percent, and a nuclear energy share of around 22 percent by 2030. While the nuclear share of electricity generation increased up to over seven percent in recent years, the share of renewable energy in electricity production increased up to 18 percent, with hydropower representing the largest renewable energy source.

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