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Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia - statistics & facts

The first coronavirus (COVID-19) case in Tunisia was detected in March 2020, when a Tunisian man tested positive for the virus after returning from Italy. Afterward, despite the preventive measures put in place by the national government, including lockdown, curfews, travel restrictions, and the use of personal protective equipment, the virus rapidly spread in the country and caused the first death on March 19, 2020. Tunisia has been one of the most affected countries in Africa, according to official figures. In July 2021, a third wave of infections put the already fragile healthcare system under pressure. The deteriorating health situation and the dissatisfaction with the government's handling of the pandemic led to violent protests, which resulted in a political crisis. President Kais Saied subsequently announced the suspension of the parliament and dismissal of Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi on July 25, 2021. In September 2021, Kais Saied announced that he will rule by decree. Amidst the continuing protests, he appointed Najla Bouden Romdhane as Prime Minister, the first woman having this role in the Arab countries.

A slow vaccination campaign

Tunisia started to vaccinate against COVID-19 on March 13, 2021. By August 2021, the country had administered over four million doses. Some vaccines were received through the United Nations-backed COVAX initiative, which aims at providing doses to all the countries of the world, particularly Africa. Further doses were directly donated by foreign countries. Following the dramatic surge in the number of cases and deaths in July 2021, Tunisia received donations from Algeria, Europe, China, and the United Arab Emirates, which allowed for an acceleration of the vaccination campaign. Although the country reached one of the highest vaccination rates in Africa, the share of the population completely immunized was still too low to prevent the rapid spread of the virus in summer 2021. As in the rest of the world, the deteriorating health crisis had adverse consequences on economic growth.

Severe economic and social impact

Due to the pandemic, the Tunisian economy experienced a sharp contraction. GDP fell by over 21 percent in the second quarter of 2020 compared to the previous year, and all economic sectors were heavily impacted. The country’s business environment also suffered, with most companies reporting declines in sales a few months after the COVID-19 outbreak. Reduced business activities additionally affected the labor market, since many employees lost their job or had reduced working hours. As a result, the unemployment rate increased to 16.7 percent in 2020 compared to 15.13 percent the year before. While economic growth was still expected in 2021, the uncertain developments of the pandemic in the country leave doubts about an upcoming recovery.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Mortality

Vaccination

Socio-economic impact

Interesting statistics

In the following 8 chapters, you will quickly find the 47 most important statistics relating to "Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia".

Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia - statistics & facts

The first coronavirus (COVID-19) case in Tunisia was detected in March 2020, when a Tunisian man tested positive for the virus after returning from Italy. Afterward, despite the preventive measures put in place by the national government, including lockdown, curfews, travel restrictions, and the use of personal protective equipment, the virus rapidly spread in the country and caused the first death on March 19, 2020. Tunisia has been one of the most affected countries in Africa, according to official figures. In July 2021, a third wave of infections put the already fragile healthcare system under pressure. The deteriorating health situation and the dissatisfaction with the government's handling of the pandemic led to violent protests, which resulted in a political crisis. President Kais Saied subsequently announced the suspension of the parliament and dismissal of Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi on July 25, 2021. In September 2021, Kais Saied announced that he will rule by decree. Amidst the continuing protests, he appointed Najla Bouden Romdhane as Prime Minister, the first woman having this role in the Arab countries.

A slow vaccination campaign

Tunisia started to vaccinate against COVID-19 on March 13, 2021. By August 2021, the country had administered over four million doses. Some vaccines were received through the United Nations-backed COVAX initiative, which aims at providing doses to all the countries of the world, particularly Africa. Further doses were directly donated by foreign countries. Following the dramatic surge in the number of cases and deaths in July 2021, Tunisia received donations from Algeria, Europe, China, and the United Arab Emirates, which allowed for an acceleration of the vaccination campaign. Although the country reached one of the highest vaccination rates in Africa, the share of the population completely immunized was still too low to prevent the rapid spread of the virus in summer 2021. As in the rest of the world, the deteriorating health crisis had adverse consequences on economic growth.

Severe economic and social impact

Due to the pandemic, the Tunisian economy experienced a sharp contraction. GDP fell by over 21 percent in the second quarter of 2020 compared to the previous year, and all economic sectors were heavily impacted. The country’s business environment also suffered, with most companies reporting declines in sales a few months after the COVID-19 outbreak. Reduced business activities additionally affected the labor market, since many employees lost their job or had reduced working hours. As a result, the unemployment rate increased to 16.7 percent in 2020 compared to 15.13 percent the year before. While economic growth was still expected in 2021, the uncertain developments of the pandemic in the country leave doubts about an upcoming recovery.

Interesting statistics

In the following 8 chapters, you will quickly find the 47 most important statistics relating to "Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Tunisia".

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