U.S. energy - heat content of petroleum supplied 1960-2016

U.S. heat content of petroleum and petroleum products supplied from 1960 to 2016 (in trillion Btu)

U.S. energy - heat content of petroleum supplied 1960-2016 The statistic shows U.S. heat content of petroleum and petroleum products supplied from 1960 through 2015. In 2005, the heat content of these products was approximately 40.64 quadrillion British thermal units. According to the source, heat content is defined as the amount of heat energy available to be released by the transformation or use of a specified physical unit of an energy form (e.g. a barrel of oil).
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U.S. heat content of petroleum and petroleum products supplied from 1960 to 2016 (in trillion Btu)

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Heat content in trillion British thermal units
1960*19,919
1965*23,246
1970*29,521
197532,731
198034,205
198530,925
199033,552
199534,556
200038,406
200540,641
201036,561
201135,925
201235,126
201335,818
201436,094
201536,873
201637,330
Heat content in trillion British thermal units
1960*19,919
1965*23,246
1970*29,521
197532,731
198034,205
198530,925
199033,552
199534,556
200038,406
200540,641
201036,561
201135,925
201235,126
201335,818
201436,094
201536,873
201637,330
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The statistic shows U.S. heat content of petroleum and petroleum products supplied from 1960 through 2015. In 2005, the heat content of these products was approximately 40.64 quadrillion British thermal units. According to the source, heat content is defined as the amount of heat energy available to be released by the transformation or use of a specified physical unit of an energy form (e.g. a barrel of oil).
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Release date
September 2017
Region
United States
Survey time period
1960 to 2016
Supplementary notes
Values from 1960 to 1970 were taken from EIA's Annual Energy Review (page 157), released in October 2011.
According to the source, heat content is the amount of heat energy available to be released by the transformation or use of a specified physical unit of an energy form (e.g., a ton of coal, a barrel of oil, a kilowatthour of electricity, a cubic foot of natural gas, or a pound of steam).
The abbreviation EIA stands for Energy Information Administration.
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