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Energy prices in the EU - Statistics & Facts

Energy prices are largely determined by production volumes of raw materials and their demand. As the U.S. has improved its fracking techniques and countries like Saudi Arabia are stepping up oil extraction, commodity prices have become cheaper across the globe. The oil glut in 2016 more than halved energy prices between 2013 and 2016. Projections see the price index rising again from 2020 onwards. However, these estimates were made before the coronavirus pandemic and the Saudi Arabia-Russia oil dispute made economic outlooks uncertain.

The European Union’s largest electricity consumer per capita is France. With an annual consumption of over 7,000 kilowatt hours per capita, it is also the sixth largest in the world. Oil is still the most commonly sourced fuel for primary energy consumption across the EU. It is the only fossil fuel that had seen usage volumes increase since 2010. This is in spite of the EU urging member states to radically improve greenhouse gas emissions and a European climate law currently under consideration, which would make the European Green Deal a legal obligation for all members.

Germans pay the most for electricity worldwide. Including Germany, eight of the ten most expensive countries for electricity are part of the European Union (counting the United Kingdom). German households with an annual consumption of less than 2,500 kilowatt hours, paid 34.53 euro cents per kilowatt hour in 2019. Generally, household electricity prices increased across the whole of the EU, whereas household natural gas prices have become cheaper again in recent years.

Residential customers typically have to pay more for energy than industrial customers. This is true for both electricity and natural gas. In 2019, Industrial electricity prices were cheapest in Sweden, at 5.27 euro cents per kilowatt hour for those with an annual consumption between 20,000 and 70,000 megawatts. However, the opposite was true for natural gas, with industry gas prices in Sweden the most expensive in the EU.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Energy prices in the EU" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Household electricity prices

Industrial electricity prices

Household gas prices

Industrial gas prices

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Energy prices in the EU".

Energy prices in the EU

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Energy prices in the EU - Statistics & Facts

Energy prices are largely determined by production volumes of raw materials and their demand. As the U.S. has improved its fracking techniques and countries like Saudi Arabia are stepping up oil extraction, commodity prices have become cheaper across the globe. The oil glut in 2016 more than halved energy prices between 2013 and 2016. Projections see the price index rising again from 2020 onwards. However, these estimates were made before the coronavirus pandemic and the Saudi Arabia-Russia oil dispute made economic outlooks uncertain.

The European Union’s largest electricity consumer per capita is France. With an annual consumption of over 7,000 kilowatt hours per capita, it is also the sixth largest in the world. Oil is still the most commonly sourced fuel for primary energy consumption across the EU. It is the only fossil fuel that had seen usage volumes increase since 2010. This is in spite of the EU urging member states to radically improve greenhouse gas emissions and a European climate law currently under consideration, which would make the European Green Deal a legal obligation for all members.

Germans pay the most for electricity worldwide. Including Germany, eight of the ten most expensive countries for electricity are part of the European Union (counting the United Kingdom). German households with an annual consumption of less than 2,500 kilowatt hours, paid 34.53 euro cents per kilowatt hour in 2019. Generally, household electricity prices increased across the whole of the EU, whereas household natural gas prices have become cheaper again in recent years.

Residential customers typically have to pay more for energy than industrial customers. This is true for both electricity and natural gas. In 2019, Industrial electricity prices were cheapest in Sweden, at 5.27 euro cents per kilowatt hour for those with an annual consumption between 20,000 and 70,000 megawatts. However, the opposite was true for natural gas, with industry gas prices in Sweden the most expensive in the EU.

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