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Confectionery in France - statistics & facts

Eating 8.87 kilograms of sugar confectionery and chocolate combined on average per year, French people have earned their spot among other sweet tooth nations. Jellified confectionery, such as gummy bears, is the kind of sweets both produced and consumed in the highest volume across the country. Nonetheless, adults and children also enjoy the various combinations of sugar, flavors, and dyes in all their other shapes and textures, with a special place for chocolate.

Even so, confectionery can be polarizing. Indeed, candy can be associated with sweetness and comfort as often as with diabetes and tooth problems. Incidentally, communication campaigns for candies and chocolate are often playful and positive, and brands are always willing to attach their names to various sporting events. These strategies are indeed necessary as foods and diets have become progressively more scrutinized.

Decried by dieticians, sugar has been the subject of particular attention for some years. Politicians, for instance, like to pick it as a key issue, suggesting and implementing taxes on soft drinks and other sweet products. As a result, the overall confectionery market is experiencing structural difficulties, which have caused a decrease in sales in recent years, both worldwide and in France.

To tackle this issue and in response to the development of more sustainable habits among the population, many confectionery companies are adapting their strategies. Some brands are manufacturing products with reduced sugar, while others are removing some additives from their sweets, for example.
Whether these endeavors will meet any considerable success remains to be seen: while the average spending on confectionery per capita is expected to increase slightly in years to come, it is also possible that this growth will be caused by inflation.

Key figures

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International trade

Retail and sales

Consumer perception and habits

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the 37 most important statistics relating to "Confectionery in France".

The confectionery market in France

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Confectionery in France - statistics & facts

Eating 8.87 kilograms of sugar confectionery and chocolate combined on average per year, French people have earned their spot among other sweet tooth nations. Jellified confectionery, such as gummy bears, is the kind of sweets both produced and consumed in the highest volume across the country. Nonetheless, adults and children also enjoy the various combinations of sugar, flavors, and dyes in all their other shapes and textures, with a special place for chocolate.

Even so, confectionery can be polarizing. Indeed, candy can be associated with sweetness and comfort as often as with diabetes and tooth problems. Incidentally, communication campaigns for candies and chocolate are often playful and positive, and brands are always willing to attach their names to various sporting events. These strategies are indeed necessary as foods and diets have become progressively more scrutinized.

Decried by dieticians, sugar has been the subject of particular attention for some years. Politicians, for instance, like to pick it as a key issue, suggesting and implementing taxes on soft drinks and other sweet products. As a result, the overall confectionery market is experiencing structural difficulties, which have caused a decrease in sales in recent years, both worldwide and in France.

To tackle this issue and in response to the development of more sustainable habits among the population, many confectionery companies are adapting their strategies. Some brands are manufacturing products with reduced sugar, while others are removing some additives from their sweets, for example.
Whether these endeavors will meet any considerable success remains to be seen: while the average spending on confectionery per capita is expected to increase slightly in years to come, it is also possible that this growth will be caused by inflation.

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