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Halloween in the U.S. - Statistics & Facts

Halloween, also known as All Hallowe’en or All Hallows’ Eve, is a holiday celebration that takes place on October 31 each year. And while Halloween has dark origins spanning hundreds of years, it has evolved into more of a commercial tradition, in which people dress up, carve out pumpkins, and children haunt their neighbors in the hopes of acquiring confectionery.

This is especially true in the United States, where annual Halloween expenditure is set to reach an all-time high of over ten billion U.S. dollars in 2021. It was also found that many American consumers planned to begin shopping for the event quite early on: just over a third of U.S. consumers said they would begin shopping for Halloween in September, while about one in ten intended to start even before autumn officially began. Whether it be for adults, children, or their pet(s), costumes are the main items that consumers spend the most money on, with projected Halloween costume expenditure amounting to a total of roughly 3.3 billion U.S. dollars in 2021.

Insidious traditions

In 2021, some two-thirds of consumers in the United States said they intend to celebrate Halloween. Some of the most common ways to honor the holiday in the United States included decorating one’s home, carving out pumpkins and wearing scary costumes. The most common tradition, however, involved candy. Close to 70 percent of Americans were planning to hand out sweets and treats on that fateful evening in October.

Quarantine

Although many Americans have now been vaccinated and the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is beginning to subside, the holiday season may still look somewhat different when compared to the past. Around 70 percent of American consumers believed COVID-19 will affect how they celebrate Halloween this year, however, only about 15 percent believed it would have a significant impact on their plans. A considerable share of people even went as far as to say they would have more fun this Halloween: for 2021’s Halloween, nearly 40 percent of Americans expected they would have more fun trick-or-treating this time around than they did last year.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Halloween in the U.S." and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Expenditure

Consumer Behavior

Pumpkin production & consumption

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the 33 most important statistics relating to "Halloween in the U.S.".

Halloween in the U.S.

Dossier on the topic

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Halloween in the U.S. - Statistics & Facts

Halloween, also known as All Hallowe’en or All Hallows’ Eve, is a holiday celebration that takes place on October 31 each year. And while Halloween has dark origins spanning hundreds of years, it has evolved into more of a commercial tradition, in which people dress up, carve out pumpkins, and children haunt their neighbors in the hopes of acquiring confectionery.

This is especially true in the United States, where annual Halloween expenditure is set to reach an all-time high of over ten billion U.S. dollars in 2021. It was also found that many American consumers planned to begin shopping for the event quite early on: just over a third of U.S. consumers said they would begin shopping for Halloween in September, while about one in ten intended to start even before autumn officially began. Whether it be for adults, children, or their pet(s), costumes are the main items that consumers spend the most money on, with projected Halloween costume expenditure amounting to a total of roughly 3.3 billion U.S. dollars in 2021.

Insidious traditions

In 2021, some two-thirds of consumers in the United States said they intend to celebrate Halloween. Some of the most common ways to honor the holiday in the United States included decorating one’s home, carving out pumpkins and wearing scary costumes. The most common tradition, however, involved candy. Close to 70 percent of Americans were planning to hand out sweets and treats on that fateful evening in October.

Quarantine

Although many Americans have now been vaccinated and the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is beginning to subside, the holiday season may still look somewhat different when compared to the past. Around 70 percent of American consumers believed COVID-19 will affect how they celebrate Halloween this year, however, only about 15 percent believed it would have a significant impact on their plans. A considerable share of people even went as far as to say they would have more fun this Halloween: for 2021’s Halloween, nearly 40 percent of Americans expected they would have more fun trick-or-treating this time around than they did last year.

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