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Employment in Europe - Statistics & Facts

The gradual recovery of the European labor market after the global financial crisis of the late 2000s was brought to a sudden halt in 2020, after the arrival of the Coronavirus pandemic in Spring of that year. At the end of 2019, there were more 227.4 million people employed in the European Union and United Kingdom, with this number dropping by six million in the first half of 2020. For the 27 member states of the EU, the employment rate fell to 66.9 percent, the lowest employment rate since early 2018. The unemployment rate, which had fallen to as low as 6.4 percent in 2019, rapidly increased to 7.7 percent by the summer.

Mass unemployment kept at bay

While the labor market figures for 2020 are clearly concerning, they would be much worse were it not for the unprecedented levels of governmental assistance provided early in the pandemic. One of the most important measures that European governments have utilized are job retention schemes, such as France's Chômage partiel scheme, or Germany's Kurzarbeit system. Although some of these employment structures were in place before 2020, the number of employees they have taken on increased significantly in 2020. In order to help EU member states pay for schemes such as these, the European Union has aims to provide 100 billion Euros in unemployment support funds, in the form of loans, with eighteen member states applying for financial assistance from this mechanism. While one of the implicit purposes of the fund was to encourage solidarity between European economies, it is unlikely to address long-term geographic disparities in the labor market. The unemployment rate in Europe for example, currently ranges from 16.5 percent in Greece, to just 3.1 percent in Czechia. Among the largest economies in Europe, Spain has consistently had a far higher unemployment rate than that of Germany, although that gap has narrowed somewhat since 2013.

Traits of the European Labor Market

While the vast majority of workers in Europe are full-time workers, an increasing number of people in Europe only work part-time. There is also a significant number of self-employed workers, as well as those who only work on a temporary basis. Another flexible working arrangement that has become increasingly popular, in recent years, is working from home a privilege which 37.2 percent of Swedish workers were able to take advantage of in 2019, compared with the European average of 16.1 percent of workers.

Key figures

The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of "Employment in Europe" and take you straight to the corresponding statistics.

Unemployment

Labor Force

Wages and Earnings

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Employment in Europe".

Employment in Europe

Dossier on the topic

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Employment in Europe - Statistics & Facts

The gradual recovery of the European labor market after the global financial crisis of the late 2000s was brought to a sudden halt in 2020, after the arrival of the Coronavirus pandemic in Spring of that year. At the end of 2019, there were more 227.4 million people employed in the European Union and United Kingdom, with this number dropping by six million in the first half of 2020. For the 27 member states of the EU, the employment rate fell to 66.9 percent, the lowest employment rate since early 2018. The unemployment rate, which had fallen to as low as 6.4 percent in 2019, rapidly increased to 7.7 percent by the summer.

Mass unemployment kept at bay

While the labor market figures for 2020 are clearly concerning, they would be much worse were it not for the unprecedented levels of governmental assistance provided early in the pandemic. One of the most important measures that European governments have utilized are job retention schemes, such as France's Chômage partiel scheme, or Germany's Kurzarbeit system. Although some of these employment structures were in place before 2020, the number of employees they have taken on increased significantly in 2020. In order to help EU member states pay for schemes such as these, the European Union has aims to provide 100 billion Euros in unemployment support funds, in the form of loans, with eighteen member states applying for financial assistance from this mechanism. While one of the implicit purposes of the fund was to encourage solidarity between European economies, it is unlikely to address long-term geographic disparities in the labor market. The unemployment rate in Europe for example, currently ranges from 16.5 percent in Greece, to just 3.1 percent in Czechia. Among the largest economies in Europe, Spain has consistently had a far higher unemployment rate than that of Germany, although that gap has narrowed somewhat since 2013.

Traits of the European Labor Market

While the vast majority of workers in Europe are full-time workers, an increasing number of people in Europe only work part-time. There is also a significant number of self-employed workers, as well as those who only work on a temporary basis. Another flexible working arrangement that has become increasingly popular, in recent years, is working from home a privilege which 37.2 percent of Swedish workers were able to take advantage of in 2019, compared with the European average of 16.1 percent of workers.

Interesting statistics

In the following 5 chapters, you will quickly find the {amountStatistics} most important statistics relating to "Employment in Europe".

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